The Structure of a Tragic Drama TV Show

The Structure of a Tragic Drama TV Show

  • $79.99
    Unit price per 


ABOUT THE WEBINAR

Tragic dramas are among the most powerful stories in Hollywood. Whether it's THE ASSASSINATION OF GIANNI VERSACE, THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, or such classic gems as THE WRESTLER or 300, if you have a deeply poignant story with tragic elements, you need to understand how to shape that in a cinematically appealing commercial structure -- that's what the masters of this genre, like Darren Aronofsky and Ryan Murphy do.

Peter has sold a tragic drama mini-series - THE MAGNIFICENT JACK JOHNSON - in 2018, using many of the elements he will teach you in this webinar. You'll learn how to build characters who contain tragic flaws but also the potential for redemption (a key element for Hollywood tragedy.) You'll see how to build the right 'arc' for these characters, and you'll also see what causes the tragedy to be either noble or just...well, a tragic failure! Both can work well in a cinematic story. Which one will you choose for your story? Come to the webinar and get help in making that critical choice.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  • The secret of most great tragic characters
  • Figuring out how to 'arc' your character to a redemptive tragic ending
  • What core wounds work best in tragedy
  • The big influencer in almost all tragic characters journeys
  • The critical place in your story where the hero chooses nobility or futility
  • What the Greek tragic hero teaches that makes for cool Hollywood superheroes

WHO SHOULD WATCH?

  • Writers who are writing 'dark' tragic heroes
  • Creators who seek huge highs and lows in their stories
  • Producers who want fabulous villains
  • Editors who need to structure the character arc for their secondary leads
  • Writers who can't decide whether they want a 'full dark' ending or a 'redemptive' one
  • Writers of love stories who need deeper relationships for their protagonists
  • Action writers who want a social message for their heroes
  • Anyone who seeks to understand why tragedy appeals to audiences